Scott Shine’s recent public records request, I think I am in somebody’s head.




“School board island” now that’s not a TV show I would watch





Um half of his requests have to do with me, ooolala I have the vapors.





Some fun above but as you can see below what the SB had to deal with while he was on the board. If he didn’t get his way he would have tantrums or run to the media. Spoiler alert Scott the problems with decorum were all about you. Shine was an awful SB member and we are way better off without him.


Finally KUDOS to the records department, the turn around, I made a request, fell asleep, woke up and it was there, was outstanding.

Scott Shine asks the district for my correspondence.

I think this means I must be doing something right.

I received this email.

First Scott doesn’t seem unhinged in this email, a big difference form other ones I have seen from him, almost polite.

Second, Scott’s mistaken if he thinks it’s the board who gives me my information, I get it from parents, teachers, community members,  and people that care about public education. People that are outraged that a cabal of rich and mostly white men want to dismantle our public schools, and to whom things like facts, evidence and what is right don’t matter. That’s who I get my information from. Plus have you read my stuff? 90 percent of it is just me commenting on the things people like Shine do.

Scott will be disappointed with what he gets but maybe I won’t because I sent Ms. Grant the following e-mail.

I would like to know everything that Scott Shine has requested in the last sixty days.
Thank You so much and have a great day 
So two can play at Scott’s little game.

Scott Shine’s lies and half truths about the referendum

This guy I am sorry, these guys, Shine, Curry and Chartrand, the members of the city council that are carrying their water they don’t want to have an honest debate, like when Chartrand straight up lied in an op-ed, saying the district didn’t have plans to share tax revenues with charter schools. Well Shine was less than honest over and over in his letter to the city council.


I gave myself thirty minutes, that’s all I wanted to spend on Shine’s letter and I was able to debunk most of it.


He wrote,     

  • Dr. Vitti discussed an estimated $1 billion need two years ago.  How do you account for the number at nearly $2 billion today?

Two years ago after he left for Detroit, seems strange. I did find this from three and a half years ago.
 https://www.news4jax.com/education/superintendent-duval-county-needs-1-billion-for-schools?fbclid=IwAR1NJuZJ_LnIDafqQFfop9vQVC53AbXNwZNnmuoOU0oAfm1Zf5tHMSMWQHQ


So Vitti off the top of his head without the benefit of a comprehensive study threw out a billion dollars. Maybe it was, but it’s my bet he was just spit balling and a lot can happen in three and a half years when you don’t address serious issues. 

He wrote,

  • Last week, Idea Charter Schools announced they will bring 12 to 14 schools to Jacksonville – mostly in the urban core.  How are charters recognized as an impact to student populations?

I scoured the internet for this one because it would be big news right. Something maybe the local news would cover.  Now opportunity zones for schools of hope have been expanded,  and we know Education Commissioner Corcoran would love IDEA to come to Jacksonville but right now there has been no announced expansion here though they have announced expansion elsewhere. 
https://ideapublicschools.org/news-events/idea-public-schools-announces-expansion-to-the-greater-houston-area


He wrote,

In 2017, the Florida Department of Education released a study that showed Charter Schools out-performed traditional public schools on standardized tests.

I think this study is highly debatable but why didn’t he use the study that came out just last month? Why did he have to go back a few years? I mean isn’t that suspicious for a guy who is supposedly in the know? Is it because this report didn’t say things he wants you to hear? Spoiler charters can do know wrong in Tallahassee’s eyes but why he didn’t use the current report if befuddling. 
http://www.fldoe.org/newsroom/latest-news/new-report-finds-florida-charter-school-students-consistently-outperform-their-peers-in-traditional-public-schools.stml


This link will take you to the 350 charter schools that have closed in Florida, including the 22 that have closed in Duval alone and you will see a KIPP school among them.
http://app4.fldoe.org/CSA/PostToWeb/ManageSearch.aspx 


He wrote,

  • Some estimates show a realistic attrition in Duval traditional public schools at 1,000 to 2,000 per year.

Oh some estimates, well sure, can we see these estimates and who put them out? Was it a pro charter group? Um if IDEA is going to open a dozen schools wouldn’t that estimate be a lot higher? Charter school growth has slowed in Jacksonville despite the increase in the number of schools. The truth is the district has lost 12-14,000 kids to charter schools, 40 charter schools, but we have lost a heck of a lot more do to people leaving for the suburbs. 


He wrote,

These “philanthropic” charters bring additional money into public education though state funding and local giving.  KIPP school alone brings in about $2 million additional dollars each year from philanthropy.  

If KIPP is bringing in that much extra why did Jason Fischer insert 2 million into the state budget, something he does with regularity? Um since they don’t need it can we get that money back? Was that a good use of limited resources? Why isn’t he or anyone quite frankly fighting for public schools to get extra money. https://www.flsenate.gov/Session/Appropriations/2019




Finally he wrote,

 Florida Times Union, 6/4/2019: “A School Board member, who asked not to be named, said that when mapping out the master facilities plan, board members were discouraged from relying too heavily on charter school locations in planning.”

The complete quote was, A School Board member, who asked not to be named, said that when mapping out the master facilities plan, board members were discouraged from relying too heavily on charter school locations in planning.

“Because we have no control of charters closing at will, it would be irresponsible to put much consideration in making space for them and then potentially leaving children and families in neighborhoods without a community public school if they were to fail or simply close,” the School Board member said. 
The board member compared the facility master plan to the grocery business.
“Fresh Market and Publix are both grocery stores, but Publix isn’t backing out of neighborhoods to make room for Fresh Market — that’s bad business,” they said. “Instead, they’d look at how they can provide a similar experience to the consumer, but they have to have adequate revenue and resources to compete.”

That is a heck of a lot different from what Shine implied and the reason SB members occasionally go off the record was they have a policy to let the chair speak for them. This SB member obviously had no problem with the plan, despite Shine’s insidious implications.

And that is my 30 minutes.

Some people might ask, well whats the difference between Shine and me, we’re just different sides of the same coin, well I sourced everything I could for starters, where Shine a man who basically quit  his job and lied about it just expects you to take his word for it.

How can we have an honest debate when the side fighting against the referendum, isn’t willing to be honest.

And in case you think I may be the only one that feels this way, a former SB wrote this on-line.
First of all, Mr. Shine wouldn’t have a clue what the district needs. He did not attend meetings for over a year and a half because he didn’t get his way. Secondly, if the district is supposed to “compete” shouldn’t they do so by investing in the technology and upgrades of buildings? I mean as he pointed out KIPP is able to get philanthropic money to make their facilities appealing to parents. Also, if charters are so much better and cheaper, why do they continually get line item money in the budget from the city and state? If we applied his logic, then the state and city are saying only kids at Tiger and KIPP matter. He is the reason our district paid over six figures for a lawsuit. He has cost the taxpayer quite a bit of money himself and I am not sure why anyone would listen to someone who failed to represent the people whom elected him to office and lied to them when questioned about his attendance.

Shine is the worst. 

World’s worst school board member Scott Shine, jokes about schools falling apart.

I learned last night he hated his first name, Francis. That realy has nothing to do with anything but I thought I would share.


Scott Shine sent and email to the city council attempting to sabotage the half cent sales tax referendum but he couldn’t help himself and sent the letter to the school board too with a snarky note attached. He wrote,

Yes, pictures of rusty pipes an leaking roofs are very compelling.  Please consider the economic and financial background in understanding this issue.  Thanks!

You know schools falling apart is very compelling. Lets just dismiss it and move on shall we.


Friends this guy basically quit while continuing to collect a pay check and he has the nerve to question the school board’s understanding of the issue. The board has literally worked on this all year bringing in experts and consultants, but he is this failed surfer, drunk on being appointed to the charter review commission saying he knows what’s best.


Um Scott you were on the board for four years, sorry you collected a pay check for 4 but were really on there a bit over three, and you were terrible and unprepared and that’s what your colleagues would say.    


I have included his letter below, I may go through it later and dismantle his points but pay attention to where he says IDEA charters is going to open up ten to twelve in Jacksonville, that friends is a straight up lie, something he and his Master Chartrand aren’t beyond telling. I scoured the internet and couldn’t find that anywhere. I know that’s his fever dream but its also not true.


Members of the City Council:
The welfare of Jacksonville’s children is no one’s exclusive domain, it is the responsibility of everyone.  Not the least of which, the members of the Jacksonville City Council.  In my four years on the school board, I was very close with the need to rebuild the school district’s physical plant.  Primarily, because I was the only board member advocating and promoting the rebuild and associated funding during that period.  The need is real.  However, the proposed plan is evolving and needs to clearly define deliverables, as well as to take into consideration the falling enrollment numbers of Jacksonville’s traditional public schools.  Concerns and questions that need resolution:
  • Dr. Vitti discussed an estimated $1 billion need two years ago.  How do you account for the number at nearly $2 billion today?
  • Do you need to build all schools to standard as “hurricane shelters?”
  • Are other school districts who have done this (St. Johns, etc.) comparable to Duval?  St. Johns has too many students.  We have too few.
  • There are currently over 20,000 empty seats in DCPS, but the plan only eliminates 5,000?
  • Last week, Idea Charter Schools announced they will bring 12 to 14 schools to Jacksonville – mostly in the urban core.  How are charters recognized as an impact to student populations?
  • Some estimates show a realistic attrition in Duval traditional public schools at 1,000 to 2,000 per year.
  • In 1965, DCPS had 125,000 students with a total county population of 509,000.
  • In 2018, DCPS has 113,000 students with a total county population of 950,000.
In 2017, the Florida Department of Education released a study that showed Charter Schools out-performed traditional public schools on standardized tests.  What’s more, Charters in the “Schools of Hope” category have been shown to be among the highest performing charters among comparable demographic groups.  These “philanthropic” charters bring additional money into public education though state funding and local giving.  KIPP school alone brings in about $2 million additional dollars each year from philanthropy.  There is the likely potential for these schools to bring in tens of millions of new, additional dollars for those students who need it the most. 
Charters are important from a capital improvement standpoint because the building cost, maintenance and final disposition of the school building is the responsibility of the charter operator, not the county.  The cost of building a new charter school facility for the Duval county tax payer = $0.  Three years after opening, charters get a smaller share of local ad valorem and state capital dollars as compared to traditional public schools.  How could this be used to save the taxpayer money and provide quality education for all?  According to your school district, it was not considered openly.  From the Florida Times Union, 6/4/2019: “A School Board member, who asked not to be named, said that when mapping out the master facilities plan, board members were discouraged from relying too heavily on charter school locations in planning.”  When a member of an elected body must speak to the citizen through condition of anonymity, you have to question the level of transparency.
We need to close schools and Dr. Greene’s plan calls for that.  I believe in the end this list may grow.  But, critical to this endeavor is a plan and funds to deal with shuttered school facilities and grounds.  We know from the past that closed, empty school buildings and grounds create blight and are associated with an increase in crime and decrease in economic activity.  We need a specific plan for the future of these closed school sites and this issue sits squarely in the wheel-house of the city council.  This plan needs to speak to economic development and funding.
In closing, I understand you have a hard job to do.  I knew four years ago that any ballot initiative for schools would need to cross your desk.  There has been much said about city hall and OGC exceeding authority.  Trust me, your role is not a surprise to anyone who studied this issue.  What’s more, when I championed this cause, my expectation was not a six-month turnaround, but I was of the opinion that two years of development and working with local stakeholders was more realistic.
If your job is only to put this on the ballot, tell me in your own words what I am voting for.  When you can answer that, it’s time to set the date.
Scott Shine